Celebrating National Chess Day! - A Note from our Executive Director

Dear Friend of US Chess,

Saturday, October 10, is National Chess Day! This special day has an interesting history spanning the last 45 years. It started as a “cultural acknowledgment” from President Gerald R. Ford as the result of efforts made by US Chess member Bill Dodgen. Years later, U.S. Senator Jay Rockefeller of West Virginia led the charge to pass a Senate Resolution officially recognizing the second Saturday in October as National Chess Day!

Have you thought about how you might observe National Chess Day? Some chess players take the opportunity to celebrate it by doing the following:

  • Play a game of chess with someone
  • Teach the game of chess to someone
  • Join a chess club
  • Start a chess club
  • Sign up for a chess tournament
  • Or….

…. celebrate National Chess Day by making a gift to US Chess! Your donation will help ensure that the chess programs and events that you care so much about will continue for you and others to enjoy for years to come. What better way to celebrate National Chess Day than by sharing your passion and love for the game? It’s a gift that will make a real difference in the lives of others and advance our mission to “empower people, enrich lives, and enhance communities through chess.”  

To make a tax-deductible gift to US Chess, just click on this DONATE link, and choose the program or fund that you would like to support. Thank you for the impact you are making on so many lives, and for your commitment to US Chess.

Happy National Chess Day!  

Sincerely,

Carol B. Meyer
Executive Director

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