Correspondence Chess Information

Contact Info: correspondence@uschess.org

Online Entry System: https://secure2.uschess.org/webstore/tournament.php.

Mail Entries to: US Chess, Attn: Correspondence Chess, P.O. Box 3967, Crossville, TN 38557

Latest US Chess Correspondence Chess News: https://new.uschess.org/category/postal

Correspondence Ratings History Search: http://www.uschess.org/datapage/corr-history.php

 
Correspondence Chess Basics and FAQ

WHAT IS CORRESPONDENCE CHESS?

Correspondence chess is chess played by various forms of long-distance correspondence at a much slower time control (we're talking days per move rather than hours or minutes!) than over-the-board chess.

 

US Chess Correspondence Chess (CC) is a great way to improve your game and have fun. You don't even have to leave home! US Chess offers CC play by sending moves through regular postal mail, via email or using a correspondence chess server.

 

GETTING STARTED IS EASY!

You choose which event you wish to enter. You can play against one opponent (match), three opponents (quad), or even six opponents (round robin). Tournament entry fees vary depending on the tournament format and the prizes involved.

 

For example, let's assume you're already a US Chess member and you want to enter a tournament in which you play against three opponents. (That's the maximum we recommend for beginners.) Once you submit your entry fee, we pair you with three other players according to the approximate strength you indicated on your entry form.

 

All four of you are sent a copy of the same pairing sheet. Players are given numbers 1 through 4, and playing assignments are noted accordingly. The pairing sheet includes the name and addresses (regular or email) of your three opponents, as well as information on the tournament format. You will play a total of six games - two against each of your three opponents, once as White and once as Black. After receiving the pairing sheet, note what player number you are assigned. Refer to the pairing chart and see whether or not you have to send your first White moves to any of your opponents.

 

It's possible that you are assigned Black for all three first games. In that case, wait to receive a White move for Game A from your three opponents. After you receive each opponent's first White move, respond with your Black move. At the same time, send your first White move for Game B in the same email or on the same postcard. After the first moves have been exchanged, you will be sending two moves each time; one move for Game A and another for Game B.

 

REFLECTION TIME

If you are asking, "How do we keep track of time?" - it's easy. We allow 30 days of reflection time to make every 10 moves. Unused time can be carried forward to the next 10-move series, which allows you plenty of time later in the game when you want to ponder a position.

 

Email events and Postal events count reflection time in slightly different ways:

  • For email events, the date/time your server receives the email is important, not the date/time you actually open the email and read it. If you only take up to 23 hours and 59 minutes to send your reply, based on the date/time your server says the email was received, then you use zero days of reflection time. If you used at least 24 hours then you used one day, at least 48 hours would be 2 days, etc.
  • For postal events, if you receive a move from your opponent today and your reply is postmarked the same day, you used zero days of reflection time. If your reply is postmarked the next day, you used one day, etc.

WHAT EQUIPMENT DO I NEED?

For email games you need access to a reliable email account and for correspondence chess server games you need access to the internet. For games played by postal mail, we highly recommend move-mailing postcard such as those sold by US Chess at https://www.uscfsales.com/correspondence-chess-move-mail-card-50-pack.html.

 

HOW TO SEND YOUR MOVE

Example: Today's date is September 6, 2020. The section number is 20CD01. If you're sending your first move as White, you wouldn't have an email or card from your opponent. Thus, you won't be noting any receipt date from the email or postmark. "Received date" is the date you received the tournament pairing sheet/opponent's move. If you receive and sent your reply move on the same day and your postmark is also the same date, your reflection time is zero days.

 

Let's say your reply date is September 7, 2020. "My time," meaning your reflection time used on the move, would be one day - provided you receive a postmark date of September 7, 2020. Your total time would be one day, since this is move 1. "Your time" refers to the reflection time your opponent used. Since this is move 1 of Game A, there's no need to fill in these blanks. (However, if you were on move 2, you would have to give an account of your opponent's reflection time calculation as of this move.)

 

Game A: Since you're playing White, your name goes in the blank box above "White" and your opponent's name goes in the blank box above "Black." Below the box labeled "Game A," under "Move no.," write "1." In the next blank box to the right, note your first move; for example "e4." This is all you would send at this time, because you can't send a move for Game B until you receive your opponent's first White move for that game.

 

You may be asking, "Why so many blank boxes to write just one move for each game?" Once you receive your opponent's move, you're required to note what your opponent's move was, along with your reply. This enables your opponent to be sure you understood and noted his move correctly.

 

Once your move-mailing card is filled in, write the names and addresses, put on the correct postage, and pop the card in the mail!

 

When sending the above moves in an email, it would look something like this:

  • Date: September 7, 2020
  • Section: 20CD01
  • Your move received: September 6, 2020
  • My time: 1 day / Total time: 1 day
  • Your time: 0 days / Total time: 0 days
  • Game A Move: 1.e4
  • Game B Move: N/A

Say your opponent replies via email on September 8, 2020, and you then send your next moves on September 10, 2020, your email would look something like this:

  • Date: September 10, 2020
  • Section: 20CD01
  • Your move received: September 8, 2020
  • My time: 2 days / Total time: 3 days
  • Your time: 1 day / Total time: 1 day
  • Game A Move: 1...c5 2.Nf3 (note we put the opponent's move to act as a confirmation for accuracy)
  • Game B Move: 1.d4 Nf6

"If" moves are also an option. These are moves you offer based on your opponent's acceptance of certain moves. Newcomers are not advised to use "if" moves.

 

ALGEBRAIC NOTATION

US Chess CC play requires the use of algebraic notation (AN), unless you and your opponent agree to another form. AN is easy to learn, simple to use, and useful for enjoying chess columns and chess books. If you don't already know AN or need to brush up, click here to learn it.

 

COMPUTER ASSISTANCE

US Chess CC play does NOT allow the use of computer chess playing algorithms or programs/engines to assist you in coming up with your moves and/or analyzing your positions. However, you may use a computer program to help you keep track of your games, and you may use any published opening database or endgame tablebase in your games, even if those are attained via a computer program or online.

 

HOW DO I GET AN OFFICIAL US CHESS CC RATING?

As a newcomer, you must indicate on the tournament entry form your approximate playing strength. This enables us to pair you appropriately with your opponents. Four rating levels are available. Class A: Very strong; Class B: Strong; Class C: Intermediate; and Class D: Novice. If you just learned how to play chess, you are considered Class D. If you know how to play and write notation and are familiar with all aspects of the game, we suggest Class C.

 

When you receive your pairing sheet (as described below), regardless of which Class you noted, your rating will appear as "Unr." When your first game is finished, we calculate your rating based on your result. If you're interested in the details of how the CC rating formula works, see our CC Ratings Explanation further down this page.

 

You now have a US Chess correspondence chess rating! Each CC game is rated as soon as it's finished. You may wish to enter more CC events, so having a chess rating will be helpful in matching you with new opponents of a similar level.

 

READY TO PLAY CC?

You should now have a better understanding of what CC is, and some idea what items you'll need to help keep your game records accurate. When you receive your pairing sheet, you will have a better idea who sends the first move to whom! You've also found out how to write chess moves and how to achieve a chess rating.

 

Well, that about covers it! We're more than happy to answer any questions. Now, let's play some correspondence chess! To register for a US Chess correspondence chess event online please visit: https://secure2.uschess.org/webstore/tournament.php.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: If I play US Chess Correspondence Chess will I get a correspondence chess rating?

A: Yes! As soon as you finish your first game, notify the Correspondence Chess Director (CCD) at US Chess and a provisional rating will be calculated. After you have 25 CC games rated, your rating is recognized as established. After each game, your result information will be posted in an online searchable database for CC players at http://www.uschess.org/datapage/corr-history.php.

 

Q: I am unrated, how do I determine what Class to start in?

  • Class A: Very strong (1800 and above)
  • Class B: Strong (1600-1799)
  • Class C: Intermediate (1400-1599)
  • Class D: Novice/beginner to chess (1399 and below)
  • (Note: If you have a US Chess over-the-board rating, use this as a guide.)

Q: Can I use my chess computer?

A: No! Using the chess playing algorithms of a software program, except when such computers/programs are expressly permitted by special rules, is prohibited. However, you may use a computer program to help you keep track of your games, and you may use any published opening database or endgame tablebase in your games, even if those are attained via a computer program or online.

 

Q: Can I refer to chess books?

A: Yes. Players are free to consult chess publications or literature but are not permitted to consult with other players.

 

Q: What equipment do I need?

A: For email games you need access to a reliable email account and for correspondence chess server games you need access to the internet. For games played by postal mail, we highly recommend move-mailing postcard such as those sold by US Chess at https://www.uscfsales.com/correspondence-chess-move-mail-card-50-pack.html.

 

Q: How do I contact my opponent?

A: You will receive a pairing sheet w/playing instructions from the Correspondence Chess Director (CCD). If you are playing in a postal mail event, it will be sent through email for players that have an email account on file with US Chess and by postal mail for all others. If you are playing in an email or correspondence chess server event, the pairings will be sent to you at your email address. You will exchange moves with your opponent via the format of the event you are participating in. If you are playing in a postal mail event but you and your opponent want to exchange moves using email, it will be allowed.

 

Q: Can I achieve a title?

A: US Chess awards the following Correspondence Chess titles to players with established ratings (at least 26 games) if your rating is: 2000-2199 the title is Candidate Master, 2200-2399 is Master and 2400+ is Senior Master.

 

Q: Where can I find the Official US Chess Correspondence Chess Rules?

A: Please check below for the official US Chess CC Rules.

Correspondence Chess Events Offered by US Chess

Entering a Correspondence Chess Event

Members who want to enter a Correspondence Chess (CC) tournament can click on this link to our online entry system. You can also mail your entry to pay by check or money order but please provide your information (US Chess ID#, Name, Event type, Email (if have one) and importantly a phone number and send it to: US Chess; Attn: Correspondence Chess, PO Box 3967, Crossville, TN 38557.

 

The US Chess CC events described below are rated and open to all US Chess members who reside on the North American continent, islands, and Hawaii, as well as US Chess members with an APO/FPO address. US Chess members who reside off of the North American Continent, can play in any of the email and correspondence chess server events. Membership and entry fee payments must be paid in US Dollars. All players must keep their US Chess membership current for the duration of their participation in the event.

 

Newcomers are welcome for most events. We do ask that upon entry you estimate your playing strength so we can pair you accordingly.

  • Class A: Very strong (1800 and above)
  • Class B: Strong (1600-1799)
  • Class C: Intermediate (1400-1599)
  • Class D: Novice/beginner to chess (1399 and below)
  • (Note: If you have a US Chess over-the-board rating, use this as a guide.)

All events are paired as soon as a suitable pairing can be attained. However, sometimes it can take a while to pair events, especially ones requiring a higher numbers of players that have rating, or other restrictions and so please expect some wait time before your event begins.

 

All gift certificate prizes in correspondence chess events can only be used towards future correspondence chess event entry fees. Gift vouchers cannot be used towards US Chess memberships or book/equipment purchases.

 

EVENTS VIA REGULAR/POSTAL MAIL

 

US CHESS 63RD CORRESPONDENCE CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP
2021 (74TH) GOLDEN KNIGHTS CHAMPIONSHIP (7 PLAYERS): (Entries open December 1, 2020 thru December 31, 2021)

 

Entry fee: $25.00; players can enter multiple times but not more than 10 times.

 

Enjoy the excitement of competing in our 74th Annual Golden Knights Championship. This event can offer three rounds of competition for those who score 4½ or more in each round. Those who score less than 4½ in the Preliminary round will receive a gift certificate valued at $7.00 and those who do not score 4½ or more in the Semifinal round receive a certificate suitable for framing. For the Preliminary and Semifinal rounds, if no player within the seven player group scores 4½ or more, those with 4 are advanced. Those players who complete all three rounds with no forfeit losses will receive a Golden Knights pin and can possibly win prize money depending on their weighted-point score.

The 2021 Golden Knights Championship has a prize fund of $2,300.00 which is based on 200 entries which is distributed among the top 10 places as follows:

  • First Place: $800.00 plus title of 2021 Golden Knights Champion and plaque
  • Second: $500.00
  • Third: $300.00
  • Fourth-Tenth: $100.00 each

The Special Rules for the 2021 Golden Knights Championship which is the US Chess 63rd Correspondence Chess Championship are posted below.

 

JOHN W. COLLINS CLASS TOURNAMENTS (4 PLAYERS):

 

A $7.00 entry fee enters you into a tournament with three other players near your own class, (0000-1499; 1500-1799; 1800-2000+). You play two games simultaneously with each opponent (one White/one Black) using one set of postcards, for a total of six games. First place finishers receive a certificate signed by John W. Collins, suitable for framing.

 

TROPHY QUADS (4 PLAYERS):

 

You can win a trophy as a reminder of your correspondence chess success! The entry fee is $10.00. You would be paired with three other players of near your same rating strength (0000-1499; 1500-1799; 1800-2000+) and play two games with each opponent (one White/one Black) for a total of six games. Games are played simultaneously. First place finishers in each quad win a trophy!

 

CORRESPONDENCE MAIL MATCHES (2 PLAYERS):

 

Matches are played against one opponent with the option of playing two or six games. If you need an opponent, we'll find you one around your same playing strength. Entry fee for each player, regardless of how many games, is $5.00 per person.

 

VICTOR PALCIAUSKAS PRIZE TOURNAMENTS (7 PLAYERS):

 

Players entering must pay an entry fee of $25.00. Each seven player tournament is within a rating level:

  • 1399 and below (novice)
  • 1400-1699 (Class C)
  • 1700-1999 (Class A/B)
  • 2000+ (Master)

If you are an unrated player please estimate your approximate strength. You cannot choose Master level is you are unrated. You play one game with each one of your six opponents (three White/three Black) for a total of six games. Winner of the tournament receives a cash prize of $130.00 and a certificate signed by Victor!

 

EVENTS VIA EMAIL OR CORRESPONDENCE CHESS SERVER (ICCF)

 

2021 (18TH) ELECTRONIC KNIGHTS CHAMPIONSHIP (7 PLAYERS): (Entries open December 1, 2020 thru December 31, 2021)

 

Entry fee is: $25.00; players can enter multiple times but not more than 10 times.

 

Enjoy the excitement of competing in our 18th Annual E-Knights Championship. This event can offer three rounds of competition for those who score 4½ or more in each round. For those who score less than 4½ in the Preliminary round will receive a gift certificate valued at $7.00. For those who do not score 4½ or more in the Semifinal round receive a certificate suitable for framing. For the Preliminary and Semifinal rounds, if no player within the seven player group scores 4½ or more, those with 4 are advanced. Those players who complete all three rounds with no forfeit losses will receive a US Chess pin and can possibly win prize money depending on their weighted-point score.

 

The US Chess 2021 Electronic Knights Championship, which mirrors the Golden Knights Championship structure but all games are played using email, has a prize fund of $2,300.00 which is based on 200 entries which is distributed among the top 10 places as follows:

  • First Place: $800.00 plus title of 2021 Electronic Knights Champion and plaque
  • Second: $500.00
  • Third: $300.00
  • Fourth:-Tenth: $100.00 each

The Special Rules for the 2021 Electronic Knights Championship are posted below.

 

LIGHTNING MATCHES (2 PLAYERS):

 

$5.00 entry fee per person. You can enter with your own opponent or we will locate one for you. Players have the option of making their match two or six games. If US Chess finds you an opponent we would try to have them compatible with your chess ability.

 

WALTER MUIR E-QUADS (4 PLAYERS): (Webserver Chess on ICCF)

 

Entry fee is $7.00 per person in these four player, double-round robin quads with class level pairings. You play both games simultaneously (one white/one black) with each of three opponents. First place winner receives a certificate suitable for framing.

 

Please note that an ICCF account is required to participate in the Walter Muir E-quads. If you do not have an ICCF account, it is recommended to sign up for one prior to registering for this event. Please follow these instructions:

  1. Visit https://www.iccf.com/Signup.aspx and sign up for an ICCF account. On the main registration page, in the Message section please enter “I have signed up for a US Chess Walter Muir E-quad event.”
  2. You will receive a confirmation email from ICCF. It is very important you respond to this email and confirm your account within 24 hours.
  3. Once your account is confirmed as set up, you will receive a final email from ICCF on which the US Chess CCD will be copied. After this step is complete you will be available to be assigned to a Walter Muir E-quad.

SWIFT QUADS (4 PLAYERS):

 

Entry fee is $10.00 per person in these four player, double-round robin quads. You play both games with each opponent simultaneously. First place winner receives a $30.00 gift certificate to use towards entering more CC Tournaments. Newcomers are welcome but please remember to estimate your chess strength! Rating pairings for this event are as follows:

  • 0000-1499 Novice/unrated
  • 1500-1799 Class B/C
  • 1800-2000+ Master/Class A

 

If you are an unrated player please estimate your approximate strength. You cannot choose Master level is you are unrated. You play one game with each one of your six opponents (three White/three Black) for a total of six games.

US Chess Correspondence Chess Rules

2004 Revised Edition

 

These rules superseded previous versions and apply to all Correspondence Chess tournaments and matches starting after December 31, 1991.

 

Your Pledge:

 

I undertake to conform to the rules and objectives of US Chess Correspondence Chess, to respond promptly to all chess correspondence and to maintain a high standard of courtesy, sociability, and good fellowship at all times in my contacts with other members. I also understand that I have a responsibility to complete my games.

 

Your Responsibilities as a Player

 

1. You must be a US Chess member for the duration of your play in any tournament.You must abide by the latest edition of the US Chess Federation's Official Rules of Chess, except when inappropriate for correspondence play. In case of conflict, correspondence rules take precedence. You are responsible for knowing the rules. By entering correspondence events, you agree to follow directions of the correspondence chess director (CCD), to respond to any legitimate inquiry, and to provide requested information. Players must enter tournaments only in their own names, unless approval for other action is granted by the CCD. A player who withdraws may be denied entry to new events. If you withdraw without proper notice to your opponent and the CCD, it will be the decision of the CCD as to whether or not you will be allowed to play in another CC event.

 

2. You are expected to act courteously toward opponents. The CCD will forfeit players who use abusive or insulting language or who are disruptive. In case of conflict, you should try to come to an agreement with your opponent.

 

3. You may consult chess books and periodicals but not other players. You cannot use a computer or computer program (chess playing algorithms) to evaluate a game, but you may use computers for record keeping and databases.

 

4. In case of appeals, retain all game records (including move cards) for at least four months after receiving notice of a game result. Otherwise, you may find yourself without a defense to an opponent's claim.

 

Reflection Time

 

5. Every day counts as reflection time including Sundays and holidays. For each 10 moves (1-10, 11-20,...) you have 30 days of reflection time.

 

You may carry unused time over into the next 10-move series. Reflection time is calculated for postal from the date the move is received until the date it is posted. For email it is calculated from the date your opponent's posts his/her move to the date you post a reply. You are charged a day of reflection time for each 24-hour period from the time the move was posted. Example, if your opponent posts a move at 11:50 PM on March 22nd, you have until 11:49 PM March 23rd to post a reply without being charged a day's reflection time. If your reply is posted at 11:55 PM on March 23rd, you are charged with one day of reflection time. If you post a reply at 11:55 PM on March 24th, you are charged with two days reflection time, etc. If you post or send your reply at 11:48 PM March 24th, you are charged with one day of reflection time. There is no transit time in email games

 

6. You must advise the CCD and your opponents of address changes in advance or at the latest within seven days of vacating previous premises. Also email address changes. If you don't, five days will be charged as reflection time.

 

Transmitting Moves

 

7. You must use English algebraic notation unless you and your opponent agree on another system. All games shall be conducted using written or typed correspondence unless otherwise otherwise indicated. Transmitted moves, including conditional moves, are binding if the moves are legal. If an illegal or ambiguous move is transmitted as part of a conditional move set, the moves immediately proceeding the illegal or ambiguous move are binding. Missing or mistaken announcement of check, capture, or "e.p." does not invalidate a move. Diagrams or commentary have no significance in disputes over move legality.

 

8. You can purchase convenient postcards for sending moves through the mail at https://www.uscfsales.com/correspondence-chess-move-mail-card-50-pack.html. Your move card must contain:

 

a. Names and addresses of both players;
b. Section and game numbers;
c. The previous move sent and your response;
d. For conditional moves, the move sent immediately prior to the conditional move(s), all conditional moves you accept, and your response;
e. Receipt and postmark dates of your opponents previous move and the date of your reply;
f. Time used on current move by you and your opponent;
g. Current reflection time totals.
If you do not include "f." and "g." with your moves, you cannot claim a win on time.

 

In the Golden Knights Finals, Absolute Championship, and other events deemed appropriate by US Chess, there is also a five-day penalty for:

 

a. Impossible, ambiguous or illegible move(s);
b. Failing to confirm your opponent's last move. An impossible move is a move which cannot be played as recorded.Notify your opponent immediately of your finding. An impossible move or an illegible move in no way obliges the player to move the piece in question. In a case of an ambiguous move, the ambiguous move must be clarified and executed. For example, if your opponent writes Nd2 and either Nbd2 or Nfd2 can be made, the person writing the ambiguous move must execute Nbd2 or Nfd2. Clerical errors are binding and once posted, can in no way be taken back.

 

9. To offer conditional moves, send them as a series of consecutively numbered moves. To accept conditional moves, acknowledge them as you would other moves. You can accept a series of conditional moves in whole or in part. Conditional moves are binding only until the next reply.

 

Example: you are responding to your opponent's second move, 2. Nf3. You want to reply 2. ... Nc6 and offer two conditional moves. Your card should have the following appearance:

1. e4 e5
2. Nf3 Nc6
If 3. Bb5, then 3. ... a6
If 3. Bc4, then 3. ... Nf6
A typical opponent's reply might be:
2. Nf3 Nc6
3. Bb5 a6
4. Bxc6 ...
(or 4. Bc6 ...
or 4. B:c6 ...)
There is no penalty for misrecording an "if" move by the sending player.

 

10. If you intend to use more than 10 days on a single move, you must tell your opponent within one week of receiving his move. If you don't receive your opponent's reply within normal transmission time plus 10 days, send a repeat. Repeat moves must be labeled as such and must include all information from the original move. If no reply after one repeat see Rule 13.

 

Loss on Time Overstep

 

11. In Golden Knights Finals, the Absolute Championship, and other events deemed appropriate by US Chess, if a player oversteps the time control (rule #5), he or she will forfeit the game. In Golden Knights Preliminary and Semi-final rounds and all other US Chess Correspondence Chess events (excluding the Golden Knights Finals, the Absolute Championship, and other events deemed appropriate by US Chess), a player who oversteps the time control on the first occurrence will be given a warning and penalized five days reflection time on the succeeding 10 moves/30 day time control. If a player violates the time control the second time, he or she will forfeit the game.

 

The following is an example of calculating a player's reflection time after a time control overstep: A player has 30 days to make moves 1-10 inclusive, 60 days to complete moves 11-20, 90 days to complete moves 21-30. A player makes move 18 but uses 61 days, thus overstepping the second time control. He or she is penalized five days reflection time. The five days are added to the reflection time he or she has used (61+5) and the player has 24 days to make moves 19-30.

 

Excused Time

 

12.You may take up to 30 days of excused time a calendar year. Additional emergency time may be granted at the discretion of the CCD. You must take excused time for all games in a section. To take excused time, simply notify your opponents and the CCD in advance. If you send a move, your excused time ends immediately. If your opponent takes excused time, you should respond to unanswered moves normally because your reflection time is still counted.

 

Submitting Time Complaints

 

13. You may submit a time complaint when your opponent has exceeded his or her allotted reflection time or has failed to respond to a repeat move within 10 days, excluding transmission time. Time complaints should include a full explanation of the facts.

 

14. Any dispute you cannot resolve or any claim of repeated or willful rule violation must be submitted to the CCD. Relevant evidence must be included. Whenever possible, continue play while the complaint is being considered. Your complaint should include:

 

a. Section and game numbers;
b. Names, ID numbers, and addresses of bothplayers;
c. Game score;
d. Supporting documentation (photocopies are acceptable unless the CCD asks for originals).
Any complaint must be postmarked within seven days of the time a person becomes aware of the alleged infraction. Failure to comply with the above, including a, b, c, and d, negates your claim.

 

Reporting Game Results

 

15. The winner must report the result to the CCD immediately upon conclusion of the game. In case of draws, White must report result. the It is a good idea for the other player to submit the result, labeling it "duplicate report." Reports must include section and game numbers as well asthe names and ID numbers of both players.

 

Thirty-Month Limit and Adjudications

 

16. A US Chess correspondence game must end after thirty (30) months from when the event begins. Either player may submit the game for adjudication postmarked one week after the tournament's end date. The player submitting the adjudication must provide the following to the CCD:

 

a. The score of the game;
b. Diagram of the position before adjudication;
c. Claim of win or draw;
d. Any analysis to support claim (optional).
If neither player submits the adjudication material within one week after the tournament's end date, the game is scored as a rateable draw. The CCD is not required to provide the basis for the adjudication result.

 

Ratings

 

17. Once play begins, games are rated whether they conclude normally or by forfeit. If your rating decreases by one or more rating classes as a result of forfeits or withdrawals, you will be required to enter prize tournaments in the rating class you occupied before the forfeits.

 

Penalties

 

18. The CCD may assess penalties for violations of these rules. Penalties include, but are not limited to, informal reprimands, warnings, reflection time reduction, forfeitures, or withdrawal. Warnings are usually issued before more severe penalties but the CCD may skip this step. Smooth and timely completion of games is the main consideration. Penalties will be assessed as necessary to accomplish this purpose.

 

Appeals

 

19. You may appeal the CCD's ruling to the Executive Director. Your appeal must be made in writing within seven days of the ruling. US Chess, Attn: Carol Meyer, Executive Director, PO Box 3967, Crossville, TN 38557.

 

Player Replacements

 

20. A withdrawn player may be replaced at the option of the CCD. There will be no replacement for a withdrawn player against whom a win, loss, or draw has been scored in actual play. A withdrawn player will not be replaced 60 days after the tournament start date.

 

GLOSSARY

 

adjudication: A judge's determination of a game's result, based on best play by both sides.

 

ambiguous move: A move in which two chess pieces of the same kind can be transferred to a new square and the player does not specify which chess piece. Example, knights on b1 and f3 can be moved to d2. The move "Nd2" is ambiguous because it does not specify which knight is being transferred. The correct transmission is either "Nbd2" or "Nfd2."

 

conditional or "if" moves: An attempt to save time and postage by offering a plausible continuation beyond the required response. Conditional moves are binding if the recipient accepts the continuations. The game must then follow the indicated continuation or any part accepted in sequence.

 

correspondence chess director (CCD): Official responsible for the supervision and direction of a correspondence chess tournament.

 

English algebraic: Conventional algebraic notation with abbreviations of the English names for the pieces : for example, Nf3 or Ng1-f3 or Bc1-f4; "x" or ":" for capture is standard. A full explanation of this system is available from the US Chess office. Please enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope.

 

excused time: Time-outs when play is suspended for leaves or for special circumstances with the approval of the CCD.

 

illegal move: A move which violates the rules of chess.

 

impossible move: A move which cannot be played as recorded.

 

Official Rules of Chess: 7th edition, available online at https://new.uschess.org/news/7th-edition-rule-book-chapters-now-available-download.

 

reflection time: The time between a player's receipt of a move and the postmarking of his response.

 

time control: Each player must make 10 moves in 30 days of reflection time. Time saved in a control carries forward. Unusual delays within this limit warrant advanced notice to the opponent(s).

 

transmission time: The time a move is in the custody of the Postal Service, that is, from the postmark date to date of delivery at the recipient's address.

Check is in the Mail Column Archive

FIDE Master Alex Dunne offered a monthly CC column, "The Check is in the Mail" which are provided here. Alex used to be our Correspondence Chess Director.

 

2020

October "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

September "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

August "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

July "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

June "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

May "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

April "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

March "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

February "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

January "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

 

2019

December "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

November "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

October "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

September "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

August "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

July "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

June "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

May "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

April "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

March "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

February "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

January "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

 

2018

December "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

November "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

October "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

September "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

August "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

July "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

June "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

May "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

April "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

March "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

February "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

January "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

 

2017

December "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

November "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

October "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

September "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

August "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

July "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

June "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

May "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

April "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

March "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

February "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

January "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

 

2016

December "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

November "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

October "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

September "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

August "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

July "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

June "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

May "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

April "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

March "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

February "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

January "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

 

2015

December "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

November "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

October "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

September "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

August "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

July "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

June "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

May "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

April "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

March "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

February "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

January "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

 

2014

December "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

November "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

October "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

September "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

August "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

July "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

June "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

May "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

April "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

March "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

February "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

January "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

 

2013

December "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

November "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

October "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

September "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

August "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

July "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

June "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

May "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

April "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

March "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

February "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

January "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

 

2012

December "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

November "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

October "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

September "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

August "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

July "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

June "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

May "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

April "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

March "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

February "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

January "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

 

2011

December "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

November "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

October "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

September "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

August "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

July "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

June "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

May "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

April "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

March "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

February "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

January "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

 

2010

December "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

November "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

October "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

September "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

August "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

July "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

June "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

May "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

April "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

March "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

February "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

January "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

 

2009

December "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

November "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

October "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

September "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

August "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

July "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

June "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

May "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

April "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

March "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

February "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

January "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

 

2008

December "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

November "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

October "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

September "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

August "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

July "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

June "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

May "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

March "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

February "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

January "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

 

2007

December "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

November "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

October "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

September "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

August "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

July "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

June "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

May "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

April "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

March "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

February "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

January "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

 

2006

December "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

November "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

October "Check is in the Mail" Column and CC News

Sept. "Check is in the Mail" column & CC News

August "Check is in the Mail" column & CC News

 

Archives

Archive of past "Check is in the Mail" columns

Archive of past monthly CC news reports.

Golden Knight, E-Knights, Golden Squire & Absolute Champions

Golden Knight, Electronic Knights, Golden Squire and Absolute Champions

GOLDEN KNIGHT CHAMPIONS

 

2013: Gary Adams
2012: Michael Buss
2011: James Tracz
2010: Michael Buss
2009: Wilbur Tseng
2008: James Rhodes
2007: Daniel S Woodard
2006: Michael Buss, James Tracz
2005: Abe Wilson
2004: Chuck Cullum
2003: John Menke
2002: Chuck Cullum
2001: John Burton
2000: Abe Wilson
1999: John Burton
1998: Leonard "Corky" Schakel
1997: Chris O'Connell
1996: Robert F. Keating
1995: Robert F. Keating
1994: Robert B. Ilderton
1993: Anthony Eaker
1992: Edward Duliba, Charles VanBuskirk
1991: Joseph A. Schwing
1990: Murray Kurtz and John Penquite
1989:Jon Applebee
1988:Michael P. Decker
1987:Stanley J. Elowitch
1986:Mike Colucci, George Kirby
1985:Andre Reichman
1984:Edmund Hermelyn
1983:Rob Salgado
1982:S. Kowalski, S. Sinding, Meeks Vaughan
1981:Tom Friedel
1980:Gary Kubach
1979:Tom Friedel
1978:Richard Aiken, Walter Milbratz
1977:Tom Sweeney
1976:K. Redinger
1975:Rob Salgado
1974:Ben Bednarz
1973:Bill Maillard, Richard Cayford, George Krauss
1972:Richard A. Cayford
1971:Robert G. Cross
1970:Juris Jurevics
1969:Robert H. Burns
1968:Kenneth Collins
1967:William F. Gray
1966:Harry Mayer
1965:Brian E. Owens
1964:Anton Sildmets
1963:Gary R. Abram
1961-1962:Lionel B. Joyner
1960:Leon Stolzenberg
1959:Hans Berliner
1958:J. Whiteczak
1957:R. E. A. Doe
1956:Hans Berliner
1955:Hans Berliner
1954:Reuben Klugman
1952-1953:Ignaz Zalys
1951:John H. Staffer
1950:Leon Stolzenberg
1949:James T. Sherwin
1947-1948:Leon Stolzenberg
1946:Richard L. Aikin
1945:Charles F. Rehberg
1944:Marvin C. Palmer
1943:John M. Staffer

 

ELECTRONIC KNIGHTS (E-Knights) CHAMPIONS

 

2017: Ferdinand Burmeister
2015: John Millett
2014: Chris Lewis
2013: Samir Alazawi
2012: Anthony Kain
2011: Tim Corkum
2010: Stephen McGregor
2009: Wilbur Tseng
2008: Wilbur Tseng
2007: James Sawaski
2006: Cesar Blanco
2005: Gillmore Hoefdraad
2004: John Menke

 

GOLDEN SQUIRES CHAMPIONS

 

1989: Isay Golyak
1988:Michael P. Decker
1987:Dan Gosling
1986:Don Eilmes
1985:Irene Aronoff
1984:Peter Ash
1983:James Bovay
1982:D. Parsons, J. Reed
1981:W. Carroll, Gary Kubach, Ed Laird, M. Ludwig, D. Smith
1980:S. Vella
1979:T. Jewell, A. Post

 

ABSOLUTE CHAMPIONS

 

2019: Harry Ingersol
2018: Robert "Bob" Rizzo
2017: Harry Ingersol
2016: Danny Horwitz
2015: Kristo Miettinen
2014: Anthony Kain
2013: Wilbur Tseng
2012: John R Menke
2011: John R Menke
2010: Harry Ingersol
2009: David Sogin, Gary Walters
2008: Ciaron O'Hare
2007: Edward Duliba
2006: Laurence Anderson, Walter Brower
2005: Keith Rodriguez, William Boucher
2004: Corky Schakel
2003: Wesley T. Brandhorst, Corky Schakel
2002: Wesley T. Brandhorst
2001: David J. Novak
2000: Richard Title, Jan Z. Koziol
1999: David Novak
1998: Edward Duliba, W. E. Maillard
1997: Stephen Barbre, Paul Thompson
1996: Kiven Plesset
1995: Dave Burris
1994:Stephen Barbre
1993:Dan Fleetwood
1992:Louis B. Owen, Vernon Vix,Jr.
1991:Ronald A. Lifson
1990:Frank Kargol
1989:James Bovay
1988:James H. O'Brien
1987:James H. O'Brien
1986:Errol Liebowitz
1985:James H. O'Brien
1984:Errol Liebowitz
1983:Robert Hux
1982:Robert Hux, Manfred Zitzman
1981:David Eisen, Ken Plesset
1980:David Eisen
1979:Chris Van Dyck
1978:Frank Camaratta
1977:Steven Tennant
1976:Robert (Bob) Jacobs

Special Rules for Golden Knights Championships (2014-2021)
  1. The US Chess Correspondence Chess Championship/Golden Knights Championship is open to all US Chess members who reside on the North American continent and islands, Hawaii, and to US Chess member with an APO/FPO address. US Chess membership must remain current throughout your participation in the tournament. Entry fees are to be paid in U.S. Dollars.
  2. The tournament will consist of three rounds (preliminaries, semifinals, and finals), each of which will probably last 2½ years. Sections for each round will consist of seven players, usually of varying strengths; unrated players are welcome as this is an Open event. Each player will be assigned six games in each round of play, three with White and three with Black.
  3. Those who score four and a half (4½) or more points (not weighted-point totals) will advance to the next round. If no one scores four and a half or more, those who scored four (4) will advance. If necessary, the last semi-final and finals sections may be filled out with players who scored four (4) points. The selection of these players will be based on the highest rated at that time.
  4. Players who do not qualify for the semifinals will receive a gift certificate valued at $7.00. Those semifinalists who do not qualify for the finals will receive a certificate suitable for framing. Those who complete all three rounds with no forfeit losses will receive a Golden Knights pin and can possibly win prize money depending on their weighted-point score.
  5. Cash prizes will be distributed as follows based on weighted-point scores (see Rule 6):
    • First Place: $800.00, plus title of Golden Knights Champion and a plaque
    • Second Place: $500.00
    • Third Place: $300.00
    • Fourth-Tenth: $100.00 each.
    • Note: Prize fund based on 200 entries and will be increased or decreased proportionately per number of entries assigned.
  6. For computing weighted-points scores (used for distribution of prizes only not for advancing), each game won in the preliminary round will count as 1.0. Each game won in the semi-final round will count as 2.2. Each game won in the final round will count as 4.5. Draws count as half the weighted-value of a win. Forfeit wins are recognized as a regular win. A perfect score (winning all 18 games) would total 46.20. If two or more contestants tie for money places, they will share equally the sum total of all prizes involved.
  7. Upon entering, each contestant agrees that the decision of the US Chess Correspondence Chess Director (CCD) shall be final in all matters regarding the conduct of the tournament, including acceptance and classification of entries, the adjudication of games, the distribution of prizes, and all interpretations of the rules and regulations.
  8. The entry fee is $25.00, which covers all three rounds should that player keep advancing. A player may enter up to 10 times, paying $25.00 for each, provided he applies early enough to allow placement. (See Rule 9.)
  9. Single entries must be processed online or postmarked by December 31; two entries by September 30, three to four entries by August 31, five to seven entries by July 31, and eight to ten entries by June 30. US Chess will not be obligated to pair entries postmarked after December 31 for the current year Golden Knights Championship. We will move your entry forward to the next year at no additional cost should the entry fee for next year be increased. US Chess will begin receiving entries for the Golden Knights Championship after December 1 of the previous year, but pairings will not begin for the current Golden Knights Championship until January 1.
  10. Except as provided in the foregoing rules, this tournament will be conducted under the most recent version of the US Chess Correspondence Chess Rules, including any amendments or additions thereto. Late reports, assignments, forfeits, and other important information will be announced by email whenever possible.
  11. A forfeiture by one player to two opponents in one section may lead to further forfeits by that player.
Special Rules for Electronic Knights Championships (2016-2021)
  1. The US Chess Electronic Knights Correspondence Chess Championship (E-Knights) is open to all US Chess members. US Chess membership must remain current throughout your participation in the tournament. Entry fees are to be paid in U.S. Dollars. All moves must be exchanged using email and all players must retain a hard copy of each move transmission to ensure documentation should a dispute/complaint arise.
  2. The tournament will consist of three rounds (preliminaries, semifinals, and finals). Sections for each round will consist of seven players, usually of varying strengths; unrated players are welcome as this is an Open event. Each player will be assigned six games in each round of play, three with White and three with Black.
  3. Those who score four and a half (4½) or more points (not weighted-point totals) will advance to the next round. If no one scores four and a half (4½) or more, those who scored four (4) will advance. If necessary, the last semi-final and finals sections may be filled out with players who scored four (4) points. The selection of these players will be based on the highest rated at that time.
  4. Players who do not qualify for the semifinals will receive a gift certificate valued at $7.00. Those semifinalists who do not qualify for the finals will receive a certificate suitable for framing. Those who complete all three rounds with no forfeit losses will receive a US Chess pin and have a chance to win prize money depending on their weighted-point score.
  5. Cash prizes will be distributed as follows based on weighted-point scores (see Rule 6):
    • First Place: $800.00, plus title of Electronic Knights Champion and a plaque
    • Second Place: $500.00
    • Third Place: $300.00
    • Fourth-Tenth: $100.00 each.
    • Note: Prize fund based on 200 entries and will be increased or decreased proportionately per number of entries assigned.
  6. For computing weighted-points scores (used for distribution of prizes only not for advancing), each game won in the preliminary round will count as 1.0. Each game won in the semi-final round will count as 2.2. Each game won in the final round will count as 4.5. Draws count as half the weighted-value of a win. Forfeit wins are recognized as a regular win. A perfect score (winning all 18 games) would total 46.20. If two or more contestants tie for money places, they will share equally the sum total of all prizes involved.
  7. Upon entering, each contestant agrees that the decision of the US Chess Correspondence Chess Correspondence Chess Director (CCD) shall be final in all matters regarding the conduct of the tournament, including acceptance and classification of entries, the adjudication of games, the distribution of prizes, and all interpretations of the rules and regulations.
  8. The entry fee is $25.00, which covers all three rounds should that player keep advancing. A player may enter up to 10 times, paying $25.00 for each, provided he applies early enough to allow placement. (See Rule 9.)
  9. Single entries must be processed online or postmarked by December 31; two entries by September 30, three to four entries by August 31, five to seven entries by July 31, and eight to ten entries by June 30. US Chess will not be obligated to pair entries postmarked after December 31 for the current year Electronic Knights Championship. We will move your entry forward to the next year at no additional cost should the entry fee for next year be increased. US Chess will begin receiving entries for the Electronic Knights Championship after December 1 of the previous year, but pairings will not begin for the current Electronic Knights Championship until January 1.
  10. Except as provided in the foregoing rules, this tournament will be conducted under the most recent version of the US Chess Correspondence Chess Rules, including any amendments or additions thereto. Late reports, assignments, forfeits, and other important information will be announced by email whenever possible.
  11. A forfeiture by one player to two opponents in one section may lead to further forfeits by that player.
Correspondence Chess Rating System/Player History Lookup

US Chess Correspondence Chess ratings are calculated as each game is reported the US Chess Correspondence Chess Director (CCD). Below is an explanation of how rating calculations are computed for Established and Provisionally rated players. If you have any questions relating to the calculation of CC ratings or other US Chess CC matters, please contact the CCD.

 

Click Correspondence History Search to look up the Correspondence Chess rating history for yourself or any other player (by US Chess ID).

 

ESTABLISHED RATED PLAYERS

CC ratings are easy to compute. Here's how it works.

 

Rn = Ro + .04(ED) +/- 16

 

This means that a new rating (Rn) is determined by taking the old rating (Ro), adding or subtracting 4 percent of the difference in ratings between opponents (.04(ED)), and adding or subtracting 16 points.

 

Example 1:

 

A 1600 rated player beats a 1400 rated player.

 

Ro + .04(ED) +/- 16 Rn

 

A) Winner 1600 -8 +16 = 1608
B) Loser   1400 +8 -16 = 1392

 

Had these players drawn, the +/- 16 would be disregarded and only the .04(ED) would be used to figure their new ratings.

 

Ro + .04(ED) +/- 16 Rn

 

A) 1600  -8 = 1592
B) 1400 +8 = 1408

 

Rating differences that exceed 350 points are figured as 350 points.
For players rated 2100-2399, the formula Rn = Ro + .03(ED) +/- 12 is used.
For players rated 2400 and above, the formula Rn = Ro + .02(ED) +/- 8 is used.
Crossing boundaries occurs when players cross 2100 or 2400. They will have their ratings calculated according to the K factor appropriate to their current rating. However, the points under or over these boundaries will be proportionally adjusted to reflect the new K. (For example, a player goes from 2090 to 2112 with a K of 16. The player has 12 points in the range where K = 12, or 3/4 of 16. The proportional adjustment is 3/4 x 12, or 9. The new rating is 2109.)

 

PROVISIONAL RATINGS

Provisional ratings are figured differently. During the first 25 games played by a correspondence chess player, we are trying to determine his or her relative playing strength. There are two things worth noting: l. provisional ratings usually fluctuate wildly, and 2. a win does not guarantee a rating will go up, while a loss does not guarantee a rating will go down. If the provisional player has beaten someone (established or provisional) 400 points or more below him or lost to a player (established or provisional) 400 or more above him, each player will be given credit for one more game played, but neither player's rating will change at all.

 

Example 2:

 

John Doe, a previously unrated player, plays five games.

 

He beats a 1200 rated player.
He beats a 1500 rated player.
He loses to a 2200 rated player.
He beats a 1000 rated player.
He draws with a 1000 rated player.

 

Here's what happens to his rating:

 

This game gives him a first rating of 1200 + 400, or 1600.
This game gives him 1500 + 400, or 1900. The previous 1600 plus this divided by two games gives him a rating of 1750.
This loss is so predictable that he suffers no penalty. He gets a game credit for the experience but no rating change.
This victory is so predictable that he gets no rating credit, only another game credit.
This draw represents a ratable result. He gets only the opponent's rating for a draw (without the 400 points added or subtracted for wins and losses). All his game results are summed (1600 + 1900 + 1750 + 1750 + 1000 = 8000) and divided by 5, the number of games. Therefore, after five games, John Doe has a provisional rating of 1600.

 

UNRATED PLAYERS

If both players are unrated and the result was a win/loss, the winner receives a rating of 1700 and one game credit. The loser receives a rating of 1300 and one game credit. If the game was drawn, each player receives a rating of 1500 and one game credit.

 

FORFEIT RESULTS

When a win is achieved by forfeit then full rating credit does not apply, for example a deceased opponent within 1 year of the start of the tournament, the winner gets 20 percent of the points awarded as if the win were over an equally rated opponent but no more than l0 points. No game credit is given in this situation.

 

Codes: 1.0=win; 0.1=loss; 0.5=draw; Q=forfeit loss; Ox=special forfeit loss.

ICCF Press Releases for New Titlists

ICCF Titles Awarded

 

Below are the International Correspondence Chess Federation's Press releases for titles awarded.

Bryce Avery Earns the ICCF IA Title Press Release
Liam Fuller Earns the ICCF IM Title Press Release
Bobby Johnson Earns the ICCF IM Title Press Release
Dr. Carl L. Siefring Earns the ICCF SIM Title Press Release
Weiland Belka Earns the ICCF IM Title Press Release
Wolff Morrow Earns the ICCF IM Title Press Release
Wes Green Earns the ICCF IM Title Press Release
Ken Holroyd Earns the ICCF IM Title Press Release

 

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