Tiglon and Zhu Earn Norms in New Jersey

Big trophies at the North American Youth

MORRISTOWN, NJ Americans Bryce Tiglon and Evelyn Zhu garnered IM and WIM titles at North American Youth Chess Championships involving the US, Canada and Mexico

Bryce Tiglon (USA) ran away with the Under 18 title and IM designation ahead of nine other FIDE masters by finishing a point and a half ahead of the field in the three country championships. Champions of the age categories U8, U10, U12 will qualify to play at the 2017 World Cadets Chess Championships in Poços de Caldas MG Brazil. Full board (accommodation and meals) will be provided by WCCS organizers.

Evelyn Zhu (USA) won her WIM title in a third tie-break with Vicki Yang (USA) as they tied for first place ahead of six WFMs in the Girls Under 18. The third tie-break went to the youngest of the two players.

The 357 players were divided into Under 18, 16, 14, 12, 10 and 8 in Open and Girls sections. Various candidate master and FIDE master titles were awarded for top finishers. The first place winners were all but one from the USA:

Under 18 Open: Bryce Tiglon

Bryce Tiglon

Under 18 Girls: Vicky Yang and Evelyn Zhu

Under 16 Open: Christopher Yoo on tie-breaks over Brandon Jacobson

Under 16 Girls: Queena Deng on tie-breaks over Kimberly Liu

Under 14 Open: Qiuyu Huang (Canada)

Under 14 Girls: Ellen Wang

Under 12 Open: Maximillian Lu on tie-breaks over Jason Wang

Under 12 Girls: Annapoorni Meiyappan

Under 10 Open: Liran Zhou

Under 10 Girls: Stephanie Velea on tie-breaks over Kally Wen

Under  8  Open: Kevin Duong on tie-breaks over Brewington Hardaway

Under  8  Girls: Iris Mou (9-0!)

The 54 player Canadian delegation, headed by Victoria Jung-Doknjas, was a spirited and successful group, walking off with 22 trophies. She noted the extremely helpful Chess Federation of Canada in supporting their efforts to make the journey.

For a complete list of results, go to https://www.naycc2017.com/

Comments

  1. In addition to congratulating the champions,
    I’d like to commend Sam Song of Canada in U18. While his opponent was away from the board he made a horrible blunder which he realized after putting the piece down. Rather than taking it back and making the right move, he left the move and took the loss. With all the talk of cheating it’s refreshing to find someone who didn’t need to be honest, but was.

  2. Might want to correct the title to say “Tiglon and Zhu earn TITLES in New Jersey.” They didn’t simply earn “norms.”

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